My Gettysburg Address

On Nov. 19, 1863, Abraham Lincoln delivered 272 words that not only helped dedicate Gettysburg’s Soldiers’ National Cemetery, but gave a sense of hope and reunification to a town and nation that had been raged by war. His words still resonate 156 years later.

In remembrance of this pivotal moment in history, we asked our visitors – what do the words of the Gettysburg Address mean to you? We received submissions from people from all over the country and of all different ages. Here are ten inspiring entries. Let us know in the comments – what does the Gettysburg Address mean to you and how can we carry on the legacy of those words today?

2 thoughts on “My Gettysburg Address”

  1. Bruce Spaulding says:

    Very proud and honored by President Lincoln’s words. Sure wish the values and ideas That he preached were practiced today. Since his day it is very hard to find many presidents who followed him to leave such a legacy and one who practiced what he preached. Wonder if the spot he actually gave the speech was different from what history told, as I read recently it was in a different location. God bless Abe!

  2. Paul says:

    The era was wrought with extremes. Opposing sides were not willing to talk constructively. This speech reminded all Americans of our roots. A call to return to our core values.

    Reminds us that assasinations usually silences the voice of reason.

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